Selling Agile to Senior Management

Selling Agile to Senior Management

The best way to promote Agile to senior management is to explain its numerous benefits and cost and waste reduction methods. Once key players in the organization are made aware of Agile’s benefits, it essentially sells itself. And, the best way to sell a methodology is to demonstrate its value by delivering quantifiable and visible business benefits, but to even get there, you first need to find a project that you can implement using Agile, and this is a challenge in itself.

The process of selling usually starts with a presentation to the key decision makers, which should at least cover the following areas:

  • Changes required in this particular department (team, tools, meetings)
  • Overview of Agile process (two to three slides)
  • Overview of user stories and how they relate to the requirements
  • Overview of tools required
  • Overview of general Agile benefits with a focus on how this particular company/department/project will benefit from Agile (reduced documentation overhead, better progress tracking, improved code quality, faster delivery, more efficient analysis of scope changes, customer satisfaction, short feedback loops, etc.)

Another very important step at this stage is to determine general expectations for Agile from senior management and to make sure they understand that Agile is not a magic solution. Some non-biased measures, as well as the success criteria for implementing Agile within a specific project, have to be defined.

Let’s return to the benefits outlined previously and see how they can be measured since some of them are very tricky (for example, it’s not always easy to measure customer satisfaction or the ability to react to changes in the requirements) here are a few general recommendations:

  • Reduce documentation overhead
  • Code quality
  • Better progress tracking
  • Faster delivery

Once you’ve obtained a general approval to test Agile you need to find a project that will demonstrate all the good things you promised in your presentation. Finding the right candidate is extremely critical and not an easy job to any extent.

This is an excerpt from the forthcoming book, The Art of Being Agile.

[Image Courtesy: Flickr/Agile/quite-silence]

Building Learning Communities (part 1)

For past couple of months I’ve been working on my latest book on Agile Learning and Knowledge Sharing – and have found a very close association of coaching with building a learning community within an organization. As someone said – “It is hapless without the hopeless, and the worthy for the just cause”, needless to say it is important to look beyond the obvious and dig deep into the realms rather just the facts in order to attain the knowledge required by each individual or a group as a whole.

I’m deeply inspired by the book “The Fifth Discipline” by Peter Senge. Though the book has a total different meaning, cause and inspiration, but it fairly well talks about the elements for building learning communities and where they stems from. As the culture within the organizations develops overtime, and the breed of experience cogs starts to accumulate and a plethora of structure of work is built around the masses – it becomes known where all the knowledge is getting piled up and built.

Knowledge creation is a key element for building the learning community, and Peter and his group talks about following key critical elements within knowledge creation:

Research 
This is the area where a disciplined approach to discovery is required, and a development of understanding with a commitment in order to share what’s being learned.Practice
Everyone works towards producing some practical results, and more so the application of energy, tools and efforts applies to all individual who consistently perform the work diligently and get better at it over time.

Capacity Building 
This is a bridge between research and practice. These are those who help others build skills and capabilities through the use of new methods and tools – in a common lingo development of best practices and processes proven over time through the use of research, discovery and  practice.Next, I’ll talk about how to take these three elements within Agile concept and apply.

© Manoj Khanna 2003 – 2012.

Pin It on Pinterest